Don’t cry for Argentina; take pictures instead

Don’t cry for Argentina; take pictures instead

Argentina, the eighth largest country in the world by land mass, has a bit of everything: thick jungles, deserts, mountains, vast plains, and glaciers. Its capital Buenos Aires has been called the “Paris of South America” with good reason since it boasts a broad array of cultural activities and European style architecture. Fine wines, gorgeous waterfalls, and a train trip into the clouds await you on this fine vacation. Getting in and out of Argentina As far as visa and passport requirements go, entry into Argentina is fairly simple. You do not need a visa for stays of up to 90 days; a valid passport that remains valid for the duration of your stay is all that’s necessary. You will have to pay a fee of $160 for entry into Argentina, however. This is called a reciprocity fee since the US charges a similar fee for Argentinian travelers to come to the US. It’s best to pay for this fee before you travel there and make copies of your receipt, which you will need to show upon arrival in Argentina. The good news is this reciprocity fee is good for ten years and covers multiple entries into the country. Popular cross border excursions into Brazil and Paraguay at favorite tourist spots such as Iguazu Falls require that you get an entry visa into Brazil or Paraguay in advance. With this in mind, plan accordingly if you wish to take trips across Argentina’s borders. There are no currency restrictions for entry or exit, and while there are no required vaccinations, you should consult with your doctor about any vaccinations that would be appropriate for your plans. Some of the more common vaccinations that Center for Disease Control recommends are the Hepatitis A and Typhoid vaccines. It might be advisable to take vaccinations for Hepatitis B, Malaria, Yellow Fever, and Rabies. The need for these is based upon what parts of the country you plan on visiting and what activities you plan on doing. Electrical outlets in Argentina differ from what you will find in the US. Like European countries, Argentinian outlets use 220 volts instead of the 110 V standard for US outlets. While some electronic equipment is capable of using both, you should make sure yours are compatible. A mistake can result in shorting out your electronics or, even worse, it can start a fire. You can find transformers...

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