Vacation in Japan: where the sun always rises

Vacation in Japan: where the sun always rises

For a singularly great vacation, plan a trip to the Land of the Rising Sun. This island nation of bullet trains and towering pagodas showcases the best of the ultra-modern and a wide ranging past. Snow-capped mountains, Zen gardens, cherry blossoms, and haunting forests all frame this beautiful country.   Getting into Japan   You do not need a visa to enter Japan for any vacation that will last less than 90 days. A passport that will remain valid for the duration of your stay is all that is needed. Unless you are a millionaire, bringing cash into Japan isn’t a problem. If you bring in more than 1 million dollars, however, you will have to declare it.   Expect to have your fingerprints and a photograph to be taken upon entry. Except with certain exceptions, if you’re traveling with a diplomatic visa or transiting to another country through Japan, you will have to submit to these requirements.   If you have plans to work in Japan during your stay, you will need to apply for an appropriate visa. Traveling visa-free with only a passport makes you ineligible to work while you are in Japan. Like many other countries, changing your visa status while in Japan is impossible, so if your journey includes plans other than vacationing, you should prepare accordingly before you land.   While there are no required vaccinations for entry into this country, you should make sure you are up to date on all the common vaccinations, such as the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), chicken pox, polio, and the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccines. Optional vaccines include Hepatitis A and B, Japanese Encephalitis, and the rabies vaccine. You should consult your doctor before a trip to determine which vaccines, if any, would be appropriate for you based upon your travel plans and activities.   The traveler’s tongue   Even though many young Japanese learn English in school, the education system emphasizes written English. Consequently, fluent English speakers are few, especially outside of areas heavily frequented by tourists. If you find yourself in a situation where you need to be understood in English, you may have better success writing down what you want to communicate, given the Japanese educational emphasis on the written form of English.   The national language in Japan is Japanese, even though there is no official language of the country. While there are numerous dialects throughout...

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